Bio – Dwain Waldrep

Dwain Waldrep


Dwain Waldrep has taught history at Southeastern Bible College since 1990. He and his wife Phyllis have one son, Matthew. Dwain’s historical interests include the history of early modern Europe, the history of American fundamentalism, and more recently the history of Ante-Nicene Christianity. He also enjoys nineteenth-century British literature, anything written by C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, and the works of American novelist Marilynne Robinson. He enjoys poetry in general and particularly the poems of Thomas Hardy, Wendell Berry, and W.H. Auden. He and Phyllis share a love of mystery novels and of classic movies from the 1930′s thru the 1950′s.

Among the books that have influenced Dwain’s thinking are David Wells, No Place for Truth: Or, Whatever Happened to Evangelical Theology; Mark Noll, The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind; Roger Lundin, The Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World; Craig Gay, The Way of the Modern World: Why It’s Temping to Live as if God Doesn’t Exist; Esther de Waal, Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict, Hans Boersma, Heavenly Participation: The Weaving of a Sacramental Tapestry and
Jens Zimmermann, Incarnational Humanism: A Philosophy of Culture for the Church in the World.

Dwain obtained his B.A. at Southeastern Bible College (1984), an M.A. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (1985), an M.A.B.S. from Dallas Theological Seminary (1991), and his Ph.D from Auburn University (2001)

Professional Associations:

Alabama Historical Association
Southern Historical Association

His published work includes:

Recovering the Margins of American Religious History: The Legacy of David Edwin Harrell Jr. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2012.

“Fundamentalism, Interdenominationalism, and the Birmingham School of the Bible, 1927-1941.” The Alabama Review 49 (January 1996): 29-54.

“The Secularization of Higher Education in America: A Historiographical Essay.” Indian Journal of American Studies (Hyderabad) 28 (Winter 1998): 91-102.

“Piety, Politics, and Southern Culture: J. J. Renfroe’s Lost Cause Ideology.” The Alabama Review 52 (July 1999): 192-224.

“Henry Edmonds and His Conflict with the Southern Presbyterian Church, 1913-1915.” In The Journal of the Birmingham Historical Society: An Anthology Honoring Marvin Yeomans Whiting, edited by James L. Baggett, 159-169. Birmingham: Birmingham Public Library and Birmingham Historical Society, 2000.

“Bible Churches.” In Encyclopedia of Religion in the South. 2nd ed., edited by Samuel S. Hill and Charles H. Lippy. Macon: Mercer University Press, 2005.

“Fundamentalism.” In Encyclopedia of Religion in the South. 2nd ed., edited by Samuel S. Hill and Charles H. Lippy. Macon: Mercer University Press, 2005.

“Fundamentalism.” In The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. Edited by Charles Reagan Wilson and William Ferris. Vol. 1, Religion, edited by Samuel S. Hill. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006.

“Southeastern Bible College.” In Encyclopedia of Alabama Online. 2008.

“J. J. D. Renfroe.” In Encyclopedia of Alabama Online. 2008.

“Lewis Sperry Chafer and the Roots of Nondenominational Fundamentalism in the South.” Journal of Southern History 73: (November 2007) 807-836.

“Bible Schools and Colleges.” In The Encyclopedia of Religion in America. Edited by Charles H. Lippy and Peter W. Williams. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010.

“Independent Bible and Community Churches.” In The Encyclopedia of Religion in America. Edited by Charles H. Lippy and Peter W. Williams. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010.

With Gillis Harp, “W. H. Griffith Thomas: Anglican Fundamentalist.” Anglican and Episcopal History 80: (March 2011) 61-73.

“Dispensationalism.” In The Encyclopedia of Christian Civilization. Edited by George Thomas Kurian. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 2011.

Review of High Church Baptist in the South: The Origin, Nature, and Influence of Landmarkism by James E. Tull. Macon: Mercer University Press, 2000. The Alabama Review, January 2003.

Review of Before Scopes: Evangelicalism, Education, and Evolution in Tennessee, 1870-1925 by Charles A. Israel. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2004. The Journal of Southern History, February 2008.

Review of Rethinking Zion: How the Print Media Placed Fundamentalism in the South, by Mary Beth Swetnam Mathews. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2006. The Journal of Southern History, May 2008.

Review of Fundamentalism and Education in the Scopes Era: God, Darwin, and the Roots of America’s Culture Wars by Adam Laats. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. The Journal of Southern History, November 2011.